The Ultimate Guide to Learn Fishing Knots

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So far, anglers are very informational people. Full attention is given to our rods, lures and reels in order to maximize the number of bites produced and also minimize the number of chances missed.

There is a purpose for such level of information. Our rods, lures and reels are essential factors of a successful presentation, and if a person is picked wrongly, the outcome is usually a poor day on the water.

1. The workhorse of the bass angler’s fishing knots is the Palomar knot. It is easy to tie, frequently known as one of the toughest knots, and can be tied with any type or size of the line. The Palomar is the best knot for Texas-rigs, jigs, frogs, smaller crankbaits, or any normal line-to-lure interface.

2. Another good knot for general purposes is the better clinch which has been used for long in many anglers’ arsenals for a significant purpose – it is really easy to tie. Although It is a bit less stronger than the Palomar, this enhanced clinch can be used with bigger baits, as a Palomar turns out to be less effective because of the need to pass the bait back through the loop. Deep and more diving crankbaits, swimbaits, and spinnerbaits are mainly used for an improved clinch.

3. When tied well, the loop knot allows a bait to freely slide around the loop. This is a great benefit for presentations that gains from slack lines. Topwater poppers, walk-the-dog style baits, and jerkbaits are the basic presentations that gain from a loop knot. The loop allows for free movement of the bait, thereby increasing the action of the lure and bringing more strikes.

4. The perfect knot for turning and pitching is the snell knot. It is very strong, and can be easily tied with heavy fluorocarbon and braid. Although its strength is a huge factor, the knot if the snell shines well when you place the hook. Because the line is well attached to the hook’s shaft and not the eye, placing the hook using a snelled hook allows a circular motion on the hook, moving it into the mouth of the fish.

Source: mysterytacklebox



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